Donovan on the Christian Solution to Evil


There will always be a cross somewhere in the midst of the Christian solution to evil, a cross of the pain involved in not returning blow for blow; a cross of the natural, human bitterness felt in the experiencing of hatred and returning love in its place, or receiving evil and doing good; a cross reflected  in the near impossibility of counting oneself blessed in the midst of persecution, or of hungering and thirsting for justice, or in being merciful and peace makers in a world which understands neither. Between us and fulfillment, between us and everlasting justice, between us and the salvation of this suffering world, there will always stand the paradox of the cross, a cross not for others, but for us. “The Jews are looking for miracles and the pagans for wisdom. And here we are preaching a crucified Christ, to the Jews an obstacle they cannot get over, to the pagans madness” (1 Cor. 1:22-23)

Vincent Donovan, Christianity Rediscovered: An Epistle from the Masai

I usually don’t comment when I post “great quotes” but I can’t post this quote without a brief aside. I’ll get straight to the point: Donovan’s quote struck me deeply because I live a life that places crosses on others. I agree with Donovan’s quote to the extent that I, and all people, are bearing their crosses for the sake of God’s reign. However, we have to remember that Jesus laid down his life on his own accord (John 10:18). No one took his life from him. The cross “in the midst of the Christian solution to evil” is sometimes the cross we have placed on others; a cross that is taking the life of another. As with most everything, context is key. What is the source of the cross? Was it chosen or was it forced?

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One comment on “Donovan on the Christian Solution to Evil

  1. […] Before we glorify in your sufferings, or tell someone to praise God for the suffering “God is putting them through,” let’s be very sure that we’re not accusing God of injustice. Instead of accepting this suffering, God may be calling us to oppose it, to cry out for God’s justice and mercy. Maybe the praise God is calling us to is the praise of lament: “lamentation is not the opposite of praise but a form of praise in which God is rightfully held accountable to God’s promises: to comfort the widow, heal the afflicted… lament is expressed not as an accusation but as… a call back to fidelity to the terms of the original covenant, and includes an appropriate expectation or longing, not a demand, the very possibility of which was created when love and covenant were first enacted” (Catherine Mowry LaCugna, God For Us, 341, 342). We lament because God loves us with an everlasting, covenant-keeping love. When we suffer – whether it comes from God or not – God does not require us to simply accept the suffering and act as though it were good a priori, as though God were “slaying us” so that we would “know God”; I think God calls us to lament.   UPDATE: In light of this post, see my thoughts concerning Vincent Donovan’s quote on the Christian Solution to evil. […]

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